INTERVIEW WITH TOMI ADESINA

Page Bloom: Please let’s meet you
Tomi Adesina: Tomi is a screenwriter, fiction series blogger and an author. I am graduate of Microbiology from Bowen University and a football ardent.

Page Bloom: While growing up, what was your desired career path? Did you ever work or do you currently work in this line?
Tomi Adesina: I always wanted to be a writer. Currently, I work as a screenwriter. I probably didn’t see myself doing this because I was thinking books as a kid, but I did write scripts for church drama as a teenager, so we can say something was aligning.

Page Bloom: When did you start writing, what influenced your writing and when did you publish your first book?
Tomi Adesina: I don’t remember when I started writing. I…I can say I have always been gifted with a creative mind. I remember writing stories from as far back as six or seven, but my parents say I did earlier than those years. Growing up, I read a lot of Enid Blyton and she was my hero. The stories were fun, simple and personal for a child. Later, I would write my own stories in any available paper I could find, these things increased my zeal for writing over the years. My first book leap in the literary space started in 2012 when I started blogging fiction. I published my first paper back, George’s Pieces of Me in August 2017.

Page Bloom: You’re an author and a screenwriter; how would you compare these two parts of you?
Tomi Adesina: When it comes to character creation, they are very similar, but screenwriting is technical in its own rights as with authoring a book. There are structures to a script and there is the need to keep to those styles in order to write a movie script that isn’t disjointed or lacking something somewhere. Not much about me changes when I have to transition between these phases, I just understand that I need to use Final Draft and its themes to create a script while MS Word is still my friend as far as doing prose is concerned.

Page Bloom: How has the journey been so far? And how lucrative has it been for you?
Tomi Adesina: It’s been some ride! LOL. Not entirely smooth but I’ve had moment of absolute cruise. It is a very competitive space which needs to give more to creatives. As opposed to our counterparts abroad (Hollywood to be specific), as with almost any other field in Nigeria, the pay is ridiculous and should be better. But I’ve had my moments and I’m grateful while waiting for better.

Page Bloom: How do you unwind/relax?
Tomi Adesina: I spend time talking with family and friends – we talk about God and a number of stuff. I watch football too and play FIFA.

Page Bloom: What is your favourite book of all time?
Tomi Adesina: Redeeming Love by Francine Rivers

Page Bloom: Are you working on a book currently?
Tomi Adesina: No.

Page Bloom: What can you say about the literary space in Nigeria at the moment?
Tomi Adesina: I’d say it’s blooming. We are in phase where a number of emerging voices are refreshingly different and just want to be heard so there is a lot of space for them. From prose to drama and poetry, it’s a really good time to be here. A lot of people are speaking their truth in words and it’s reaching down to others because it’s a time we live in which is honest and resonates.

Page Bloom: What would you consider as the struggles of a writer/author generally, and in Nigeria specifically?
Tomi Adesina: I think we don’t have enough Traditional publishing outfits to cater to the needs of people interested in publishing their books, so a lot of us are forced to toll the line of self-publishing which involves shouldering a lot of responsibilities on the journey to becoming an author. I think there is also a ready market to read but the inability to get through to all of them because of our individual frailties might make it difficult for authors to enjoy the relationship between an author and their reader, thus, reducing the value of this craft.

Page Bloom: When it comes to writing, who is your role model?
Tomi Adesina: I have many people I admire like Francine Rivers, Ted Dekker, Danielle Steel. In the Nigerian space, I like Tunde Leye and recently Ayobami Adebayo.

Page Bloom: What would you tell your 13-year-old self?
Tomi Adesina: Don’t worry…Be Happy. God has got this.

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